Hayes' Healthcare Blog

From Boardrooms to Exam Rooms: 4 Strategies to Enhance Frontline Engagement in Continuous Improvement

Posted by Henry Bernstein on April 19, 2017 at 9:00 AM

By Henry (Hank) Bernstein, DO, MHCM, FAAP, Professor of Pediatrics, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and Shannon Cleary, BA, Research Assistant, Cohen Children’s Medical Center of NY

It is well known that a key objective in the evolving healthcare landscape is improving outcomes. To meet that goal, many organizations are embracing the tenets of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Triple Aim – improving the health of populations, enhancing the patient experience, and reducing the cost of care.

Achieving success in these tenets requires implementing practice improvement. Traditionally, individual members of clinical teams haven’t been eager to participate in practice improvement programs, largely due to heavy clinical and administrative workloads. However, to accomplish meaningful, productive change, providers on the frontline must be involved in the development and implementation of any practice improvement initiative.

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Topics: physician training, improve patient satisfaction, Hayes Thought Leadership Blog Series

Healthcare Leaders Blog: A Shift to Service Lines in Hospital Service Delivery, David O. McCready

Posted by David McCready on October 7, 2015 at 9:00 AM

There is a growing interest among many hospitals—community and academic alike—to migrate toward alternative service delivery models referred to as “service lines.” The concept with clinical service lines is to shift the hospital’s care delivery model from the traditional specialty silos to a more horizontal organizational structure that is focused on patient-centric care delivery within a particular clinical affinity area. Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal service lines are common examples. The idea is to organize all related services under one broad program umbrella, and work to manage those services better and more efficiently. When well designed and implemented, service lines can be helpful to patients in their accessing one-stop care in a way that improves coordination and outcomes, and results in a measurably better patient experience. Service lines also hold the promise of bringing together related specialists and providing them opportunity for collaboration and innovation that would not have been possible while practicing in separate subspecialty departments or offices. When cardiologists and cardiac surgeons and cardiac anesthesiologists all work for a hospital’s cardiovascular service line and thus collaborate freely and with focused purpose, for instance, remarkable innovations in patient care are possible.

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Topics: improve patient satisfaction, thought leadership, healthcare leaders, Hospital Service Delivery, Thought Leaders, organizational development, Hayes Thought Leadership Blog Series

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