Hayes' Healthcare Blog

5 Benefits of Increased Patient Engagement You May Not Know

Posted by Susan Cruz on October 26, 2016 at 9:00 AM

In today’s disruptive healthcare environment, we’re hearing of all sorts of new initiatives that aim to provide the best and most
affordable healthcare to patients.  Everything from MACRA, to Meaningful Use, to interoperability.  A common theme among these is the active foundation of improving health and realizing increased patient engagement.  With the shift from fee-for-service to fee-for-value, patients and consumers are becoming less passive and more proactive and engaged.  With this idea on the tip of everyone’s tongue, one might ask questions like, how do I create the best environment for my providers and their patients? What is the best way to educate patients on what exactly is going into their healthcare? How do I increase my patient engagement?

Not unlike using the age-old sentiment that history repeats itself, you can begin to answer these questions by going back to examples of how people have been engaged in their education in the past.  When you talk about education, you intuitively think of school. Active learning is a methodology utilized in the classroom to move the students from the role of passive receivers of information to that of active participants responsible for their own learning.  Techniques used in active learning include discussion, self-assessment, projects, group learning, self-defined goals, and more.  These techniques have proven to be far more effective than the traditional learning environment in which students sit passively and listen to lectures from a seemingly autocratic authority.

Similarly, the provider-patient role in many healthcare institutions has evolved throughout history into an authority and passive recipient relationship.  But as we noted earlier, this is clearly starting to shift within the healthcare industry today.  With the implementations of value-based care, we are seeing the provider-patient relationship shifting to organically place more ownership of the patients’ own health onto their plates to become more like the traditional consumer of any good or service, and less like a passive student within a lecture-style environment. 

While the healthcare industry is abuzz with all sorts of opinions about these initiatives and the shift value-based care, one perspective you can take is to see the win-win benefits of such an evolution of healthcare, especially for providers.

Here are five benefits that you may not have realized since the industry has started to steer patients into becoming active learning healthcare consumers.

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Topics: Fee-for-service, value-based care, provider education, patient engagement

7 Things to Know for Successful Provider Education

Posted by Beth Enders on July 13, 2016 at 9:00 AM

The first six years of my career, I worked for two providers in a small privately-owned family practice in the southwest.  My responsibilities included rooming patients, checking vital signs, updating medical information in patient charts, and poking countless patients with needles. Early on I learned how to build a rapport and more importantly, build trust with people of all ages and personalities including the two temperamental doctors who yelled and threw charts.  Little did I know the skills I was developing over those six years would teach me how to handle many difficult situations and people throughout my career.

Twenty-six years later I am still in the medical field and have learned just how vital it is to the success of an organization to have a positive working relationship with the providers, even the difficult ones.  I feel the first step to do this is training the physicians and mid-level providers on proper medical record documentation.  The goal is not to turn the providers into coders, but rather to give them the information and tools they need to be able to document their services accurately and thoroughly.

Across all specialties, we frequently identify common documentation deficiencies.  Physicians and other providers are often unaware of which data elements must be separately documented and are critical for proper code assignment.  Add to this the inherent complexity of E&M coding guidelines that make it difficult for a busy physician or mid-level provider to select the correct code from an often densely populated charge ticket or EHR.  Thus, it has become necessary for people like me, a coder and clinical documentation specialist, to work with these providers to help them understand the do’s and don'ts in the world of clinical documentation and coding.

Over the past several years I have been training and conducting provider education on best practices for clinical documentation and coding and have come up with seven tips for communicating with physicians and mid-level providers.

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Topics: physician education, codes, healthcare compliance, provider education

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